Whinless Downs

  • Whinless Downs
  • Whinless Downs
  • Whinless Downs

Location

Elms Vale Road
CT17 9PR

Show in Google Maps

Contact

mail@whitecliffscountryside.org.uk

Opening Times

Open Access all year round

Facilities

Parking

About

Whinless Down

A steeply sloping area of ancient chalk downland on the edge of Dover, Whinless Down offers dramatic views over the town and Channel. A wide range of chalk grassland flowers, such as rock rose and milkwort, encourages an abundance of insects including blue butterflies. Among the rare plants are cypress spurge, horseshoe vetch and crown vetch and you will also find the rare silver spotted skipper butterfly and many rare moth species. There is a tree trail where a selection of native trees and shrubs are identified; this forms part of an orienteering activity around the downs. Worksheets are available from the White Cliffs Countryside Partnership.

Activities

English

Poetry Activities

Poetry Activities

Poets use their senses to create their poems. Here are some activities that you can do on site to help you produce fantastic poetry based on your experiences.

Other texts you might want to look at:

– Shakespeare, King Lear, Act 4 scene 1 (from ‘Dost thou know Dover’) and scene 6 (to Lear’s entrance).
– Carol Ann Duffy, ‘White Cliffs’
– Daljit Nagra, ‘Look we have coming to Dover’
– See also http://www.poetryatlas.com/search/white+cliffs.html

Chemistry

What’s Under Your Feet?

What’s Under Your Feet?

Earth is the only planet in the solar system to be able to support life as far as we know, and has been able to do so for the last 3000 million years. During this time the living environment (or biosphere) has survived because of the intricate balance of relationships between the land, water and atmosphere.
Today the biosphere is being studied by environmental scientists across the world, and as the relationships become more understood, humanity is becoming more responsible for our own influences. We are able to observe and research collectively, and are beginning to respond with confidence to threats such as global warming, and the growing loss of biodiversity across the planet.
The chalk coastline of the North Downs is one of the world’s rarest of habitats, with unique conditions and ecosystems. See what you can discover as you step out into the North Downs…

Art & Design

Art and Design Activities

Art and Design Activities

Your local area and other similar places have provided inspiration for generations of artists. Get out there to gather ideas that will inspire your own work?

What does your environment mean to you? What are your memories and dreams? Use a site visit to record your impressions and create a presentation that explains your past and your hopes for the future.

Dover artist William Burgess (1805 – 1861) painted scenes and stories of local life and also pioneered a revolutionary way of displaying them called a Cosmorama. What stories of Dover today would you like to tell through your art and how could you present them?

Geography

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

Weather reports from the Dover coastal weather logging station are broadcast daily on BBC Radio 4, playing a crucial role in warning mariners using the English Channel and South coast of dangerous sailing conditions. You may have heard Dover mentioned as part of the radio transmission sequence – Fair Isle, Viking, Cromarty, Forties?

Unbeknownst to most people, just down the road near Castle Hill Folkestone, is the remains of a rather more secretive and austere ‘weather’ observation station. During the Cold War an underground station was built to potentially house 3 dedicated ‘meteorologists’, should Nuclear War break out. Their job would have been to report a very different kind of weather – announcing any visible nuclear explosion sightings, alongside the wind direction and wind speed – helping to predict any following fall-out that would then blow across the Channel to Britain.

What’s Under Your Feet?

What’s Under Your Feet?

Earth is the only planet in the solar system to be able to support life as far as we know, and has been able to do so for the last 3000 million years. During this time the living environment (or biosphere) has survived because of the intricate balance of relationships between the land, water and atmosphere.
Today the biosphere is being studied by environmental scientists across the world, and as the relationships become more understood, humanity is becoming more responsible for our own influences. We are able to observe and research collectively, and are beginning to respond with confidence to threats such as global warming, and the growing loss of biodiversity across the planet.
The chalk coastline of the North Downs is one of the world’s rarest of habitats, with unique conditions and ecosystems. See what you can discover as you step out into the North Downs…

Cross Curricular

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

Weather reports from the Dover coastal weather logging station are broadcast daily on BBC Radio 4, playing a crucial role in warning mariners using the English Channel and South coast of dangerous sailing conditions. You may have heard Dover mentioned as part of the radio transmission sequence – Fair Isle, Viking, Cromarty, Forties?

Unbeknownst to most people, just down the road near Castle Hill Folkestone, is the remains of a rather more secretive and austere ‘weather’ observation station. During the Cold War an underground station was built to potentially house 3 dedicated ‘meteorologists’, should Nuclear War break out. Their job would have been to report a very different kind of weather – announcing any visible nuclear explosion sightings, alongside the wind direction and wind speed – helping to predict any following fall-out that would then blow across the Channel to Britain.

Differentiated and SEN Activities

Be a Wilderness Pioneer for the Day

Be a Wilderness Pioneer for the Day

We often take our familiar local area for granted and don’t always appreciate the beauty to be found there. Why not support your pupils to rediscover what it is on their doorstep by becoming explorers of the downs?