Folkestone Downs including Castle Hill

  • Folkestone Downs including Castle Hill
  • Folkestone Downs including Castle Hill

Location

Folkestone, Kent CT19 4AJ

Show in Google Maps

Contact

paul.holt@whitecountryside.org.uk

Opening Times

Any-all year round

Facilities

Parking

About

Folkestone Downs

The hills of Folkestone Downs have some of the steepest slopes in Kent. Yet the summit of Castle Hill may have been a venue for Neolithic celebrations as well as the site of a Norman castle. The hills are also home to rare flowers including the late spider orchid.

Climbing the hill and exploring its archaeology and history can give a rare insight into the problems and achievements our ancestors. As a Site of Special Scientific Interest, the downs are rich in opportunities to study plants and insects. And the bird’s-eye view of Folkestone enables pupils to map the town’s development.

Activities

English

Poetry Activities

Poetry Activities

Poets use their senses to create their poems. Here are some activities that you can do on site to help you produce fantastic poetry based on your experiences.

Other texts you might want to look at:

– Shakespeare, King Lear, Act 4 scene 1 (from ‘Dost thou know Dover’) and scene 6 (to Lear’s entrance).
– Carol Ann Duffy, ‘White Cliffs’
– Daljit Nagra, ‘Look we have coming to Dover’
– See also http://www.poetryatlas.com/search/white+cliffs.html

History

Digging for History

Digging for History

Castle Hill was possibly the site of Neolithic festivals and a Norman Castle. Climb to the top and imagine taking part in a festival or living in the castle. Why do you think this site was chosen? If you did an archaeological dig here, what do you think you might find? And what do you think we should do with the site today?

For a guided tour of Castle Hill, contact Canterbury Archaeological Trust
http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk
andrew.richardson@canterburytrust.co.uk
See also the Iron Age workshop at:
http://schoolhistoryworkshops.co.uk/workshops.html

Art & Design

Art and Design Activities

Art and Design Activities

Your local area and other similar places have provided inspiration for generations of artists. Get out there to gather ideas that will inspire your own work?

What does your environment mean to you? What are your memories and dreams? Use a site visit to record your impressions and create a presentation that explains your past and your hopes for the future.

Dover artist William Burgess (1805 – 1861) painted scenes and stories of local life and also pioneered a revolutionary way of displaying them called a Cosmorama. What stories of Dover today would you like to tell through your art and how could you present them?

Geography

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

Weather reports from the Dover coastal weather logging station are broadcast daily on BBC Radio 4, playing a crucial role in warning mariners using the English Channel and South coast of dangerous sailing conditions. You may have heard Dover mentioned as part of the radio transmission sequence – Fair Isle, Viking, Cromarty, Forties?

Unbeknownst to most people, just down the road near Castle Hill Folkestone, is the remains of a rather more secretive and austere ‘weather’ observation station. During the Cold War an underground station was built to potentially house 3 dedicated ‘meteorologists’, should Nuclear War break out. Their job would have been to report a very different kind of weather – announcing any visible nuclear explosion sightings, alongside the wind direction and wind speed – helping to predict any following fall-out that would then blow across the Channel to Britain.

Cross Curricular

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

Weather reports from the Dover coastal weather logging station are broadcast daily on BBC Radio 4, playing a crucial role in warning mariners using the English Channel and South coast of dangerous sailing conditions. You may have heard Dover mentioned as part of the radio transmission sequence – Fair Isle, Viking, Cromarty, Forties?

Unbeknownst to most people, just down the road near Castle Hill Folkestone, is the remains of a rather more secretive and austere ‘weather’ observation station. During the Cold War an underground station was built to potentially house 3 dedicated ‘meteorologists’, should Nuclear War break out. Their job would have been to report a very different kind of weather – announcing any visible nuclear explosion sightings, alongside the wind direction and wind speed – helping to predict any following fall-out that would then blow across the Channel to Britain.

Differentiated and SEN Activities

Be an Explorer for the Day

Be an Explorer for the Day

Imagine you are one of the first settlers on the downs. What equipment do you need? What do you need to know about the area? Have a go at these activities and get your pupils inspired by what’s on their doorstep!