Folkestone Warren and East Wear Bay

  • Folkestone Warren and East Wear Bay
  • Folkestone Warren and East Wear Bay
  • Folkestone Warren and East Wear Bay

Location

Wear Bay Road
Folkestone
CT19 6NQ

Show in Google Maps

Contact

paul.holt@whitecliffscountryside.org.uk

Opening Times

Open access all year round Toilets Open Seasonally

Facilities

Parking Toilets

Parking is available on street close to East Wear Bay but access is by foot

About

East Wear Bay

From the apron along the seashore to the cliffs to the east, East Wear Bay weaves a story of some ten millennia of occupation from the Neolithic era to the present. It is also a site of geological and geomorphological complexity, rich in fossils and with frequent land slips that continually reveal new layers of our past.

East Wear Bay was the site of an important Roman Villa and the beach below holds a collection of artefacts including quern stones, dating from 100BC to 100AD as well as remnants of the villa and rubble and tank traps from World War 2. A perfect site for deepening pupils’ understanding of the pre-history, Iron Age and Romans, exploring the potential of archaeology or finding inspiration for impermanent artworks.

Guided tours available by the Canterbury Archaeological Trust. Please call CAT on 01227 462062 or email admin@canterburytrust.co.uk for more information.

Activities

Maths

Dig to Discover – Become an Archaeologist for the day

Dig to Discover – Become an Archaeologist for the day

Archaeologists act very much as investigators or forensic scientists, searching for and studying any remaining clues in the landscape that can help us re-construct humanity’s development through history.
The profession developed from an interest in antiquarianism in the 19th century, through the influence of academically minded travellers like Augustus Pitt Rivers and the 18th Century antiquarian Bryan Fausseett. Pitt Rivers methodical and analytical approach paid attention to the chronology of any finds, heavily influenced by the newly published ‘The Theory of Evolution’ by Charles Darwin.
Pitt Rivers practised and honed his early archaeological techniques locally, making investigative digs into the ancient hill sites around Folkestone e.g. Castle Hill. The skills-building that happened during this early work led on to very ambitious archaeological expeditions to Egypt. Here he made major historic discoveries in the Valley of the Kings that led his professional successors to discover the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun in 1921.
Archaeological practice has since developed with the aid of technology, with new sites often being found using aerial photography and scanning techniques. Now much site information can be gleamed even without making a dig.
Look around you and imagine what it was like 100 years ago, 1000 years ago, or even 10000 years ago.

English

Poetry Activities

Poetry Activities

Poets use their senses to create their poems. Here are some activities that you can do on site to help you produce fantastic poetry based on your experiences.

Other texts you might want to look at:

• Shakespeare, King Lear, Act 4 scene 1 (from ‘Dost thou know Dover’) and scene 6 (to Lear’s entrance).
• Carol Ann Duffy, ‘White Cliffs’
• Daljit Nagra, ‘Look we have coming to Dover’
• See also http://www.poetryatlas.com/search/white+cliffs.html

Poetry – Matthew Arnold ‘Dover Beach’

Poetry – Matthew Arnold ‘Dover Beach’

Matthew Arnold wrote his notes for Dover Beach when he was on his honeymoon in Dover in 1851. Can you describe the sea as well as he does? What does it make you think of? The sea and the cliffs are ages old – how does that make you feel? What are your hopes for the future? Look around you and discover how what you see can inspire you.

Poetry – Ros Barber ‘Soup’

Poetry – Ros Barber ‘Soup’

The beach at East Wear Bay is a treasure trove of finds from fossils through Roman roof tiles and pottery to World War 2 tank traps. What can you discover? Be a beachcomber for an hour or two and write a poems about your finds.

History

Grand Designs-Roman Style

Grand Designs-Roman Style

East Wear Bay was the site of an important Roman villa. Can you map its rooms on the clifftop? And can you design your own villa, inspired by what you have learned?

More Digging for History

More Digging for History

On the beach at East Wear Bay you can find artefacts from the Iron Age and Roman times to World War 2. Be an archaeologist for the day in a treasure hunt to see what you can unearth. What do your finds tell you about the history of the area and its development?

For a guided beachcombing session, contact Canterbury Archaeological Trust
http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk
andrew.richardson@canterburytrust.co.uk
See also the Iron Age workshop at:
http://schoolhistoryworkshops.co.uk/workshops.html

Biology

Walk in Darwin’s Footsteps

Walk in Darwin’s Footsteps

The Up on the Downs coast is rich in both fossils and unusual plants, each able to offer evidence and clues to the changing make-up of the local environment, touching different times in the Earth’s history. But to stand a chance of finding these markers and then interpreting their clues, one needs the skills of a good detective.
Victorian naturalist Charles Darwin regularly visited the White Cliffs to study the fossils exposed in the face of the cliffs. His observations of the varying fossil forms, related to their locations in the strata, helped him to formulate his world-changing theory of evolution and natural selection.

Art & Design

Art and Design Activities

Art and Design Activities

Your local area and other similar places have provided inspiration for generations of artists. Get out there to gather ideas that will inspire your own work…

What does your environment mean to you? What are your memories and dreams? Use a site visit to record your impressions and create a presentation that explains your past and your hopes for the future.

Dover artist William Burgess (1805–1861) painted scenes and stories of local life and also pioneered a revolutionary way of displaying them called a Cosmorama. What stories of Dover today would you like to tell through your art and how could you present them?

Geography

Dig to Discover – Become an Archaeologist for the day

Dig to Discover – Become an Archaeologist for the day

Archaeologists act very much as investigators or forensic scientists, searching for and studying any remaining clues in the landscape that can help us re-construct humanity’s development through history.
The profession developed from an interest in antiquarianism in the 19th century, through the influence of academically minded travellers like Augustus Pitt Rivers and the 18th Century antiquarian Bryan Fausseett. Pitt Rivers methodical and analytical approach paid attention to the chronology of any finds, heavily influenced by the newly published ‘The Theory of Evolution’ by Charles Darwin.
Pitt Rivers practised and honed his early archaeological techniques locally, making investigative digs into the ancient hill sites around Folkestone e.g. Castle Hill. The skills-building that happened during this early work led on to very ambitious archaeological expeditions to Egypt. Here he made major historic discoveries in the Valley of the Kings that led his professional successors to discover the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun in 1921.
Archaeological practice has since developed with the aid of technology, with new sites often being found using aerial photography and scanning techniques. Now much site information can be gleamed even without making a dig.
Look around you and imagine what it was like 100 years ago, 1000 years ago, or even 10000 years ago.

Heroes of the Goodwin Sands – Be a Coastguard for the Day

Heroes of the Goodwin Sands – Be a Coastguard for the Day

Over the centuries, mariners using the English Channel have needed to be able to read the changing moods of the sea, understanding when and where its force might be a danger to their sailing vessels. Unfortunately the most destructive conditions for the ships could be the best of friends for salvagers, and reading the coast well could bring bountiful rewards.
As sea trading increased through the 18th century so did the need to protect any ships from coming to grief on the coast, through bad weather and wreckers. Additionally there was a growing illegal trade in importing, or smuggling goods into the country, without customs payments being made to the Crown. From these needs came the birth of the Coastguard.
Read the weather, head for the coast, and see what you can save or salvage…

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

Weather reports from the Dover coastal weather logging station are broadcast daily on BBC Radio 4, playing a crucial role in warning mariners using the English Channel and South coast of dangerous sailing conditions. You may have heard Dover mentioned as part of the radio transmission sequence – Fair Isle, Viking, Cromarty, Forties?

Unbeknownst to most people, just down the road near Castle Hill Folkestone, is the remains of a rather more secretive and austere ‘weather’ observation station. During the Cold War an underground station was built to potentially house 3 dedicated ‘meteorologists’, should Nuclear War break out. Their job would have been to report a very different kind of weather – announcing any visible nuclear explosion sightings, alongside the wind direction and wind speed – helping to predict any following fall-out that would then blow across the Channel to Britain.

Walk in Darwin’s Footsteps

Walk in Darwin’s Footsteps

The Up on the Downs coast is rich in both fossils and unusual plants, each able to offer evidence and clues to the changing make-up of the local environment, touching different times in the Earth’s history. But to stand a chance of finding these markers and then interpreting their clues, one needs the skills of a good detective.
Victorian naturalist Charles Darwin regularly visited the White Cliffs to study the fossils exposed in the face of the cliffs. His observations of the varying fossil forms, related to their locations in the strata, helped him to formulate his world-changing theory of evolution and natural selection.

Cross Curricular

Dig to Discover – Become an Archaeologist for the day

Dig to Discover – Become an Archaeologist for the day

Archaeologists act very much as investigators or forensic scientists, searching for and studying any remaining clues in the landscape that can help us re-construct humanity’s development through history.
The profession developed from an interest in antiquarianism in the 19th century, through the influence of academically minded travellers like Augustus Pitt Rivers and the 18th Century antiquarian Bryan Fausseett. Pitt Rivers methodical and analytical approach paid attention to the chronology of any finds, heavily influenced by the newly published ‘The Theory of Evolution’ by Charles Darwin.
Pitt Rivers practised and honed his early archaeological techniques locally, making investigative digs into the ancient hill sites around Folkestone e.g. Castle Hill. The skills-building that happened during this early work led on to very ambitious archaeological expeditions to Egypt. Here he made major historic discoveries in the Valley of the Kings that led his professional successors to discover the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun in 1921.
Archaeological practice has since developed with the aid of technology, with new sites often being found using aerial photography and scanning techniques. Now much site information can be gleamed even without making a dig.
Look around you and imagine what it was like 100 years ago, 1000 years ago, or even 10000 years ago.

Heroes of the Goodwin Sands – Be a Coastguard for the Day

Heroes of the Goodwin Sands – Be a Coastguard for the Day

Over the centuries, mariners using the English Channel have needed to be able to read the changing moods of the sea, understanding when and where its force might be a danger to their sailing vessels. Unfortunately the most destructive conditions for the ships could be the best of friends for salvagers, and reading the coast well could bring bountiful rewards.
As sea trading increased through the 18th century so did the need to protect any ships from coming to grief on the coast, through bad weather and wreckers. Additionally there was a growing illegal trade in importing, or smuggling goods into the country, without customs payments being made to the Crown. From these needs came the birth of the Coastguard.
Read the weather, head for the coast, and see what you can save or salvage…

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

The Shipping Forecast – Be a Meteorologist for the Day

Weather reports from the Dover coastal weather logging station are broadcast daily on BBC Radio 4, playing a crucial role in warning mariners using the English Channel and South coast of dangerous sailing conditions. You may have heard Dover mentioned as part of the radio transmission sequence – Fair Isle, Viking, Cromarty, Forties?

Unbeknownst to most people, just down the road near Castle Hill Folkestone, is the remains of a rather more secretive and austere ‘weather’ observation station. During the Cold War an underground station was built to potentially house 3 dedicated ‘meteorologists’, should Nuclear War break out. Their job would have been to report a very different kind of weather – announcing any visible nuclear explosion sightings, alongside the wind direction and wind speed – helping to predict any following fall-out that would then blow across the Channel to Britain.

Differentiated and SEN Activities

Be a Time Detective for the Day

Be a Time Detective for the Day

On the beach at East Wear Bay you can find artefacts from Roman times to WW2. Be an archaeologist for the day in a treasure hunt to see what you can unearth. What do your finds tell you about the history of the area and its development?

For a guided beachcombing session, contact Canterbury Archaeological Trust
http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk
andrew.richardson@canterburytrust.co.uk
See also the Iron Age workshop at:
http://schoolhistoryworkshops.co.uk/workshops.html